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MT81_Bracket

MT81_Bracket

Connects two or more lines of music that sound simultaneously. In general contemporary usage the bracket usually connects the staves of separate instruments (e.g., flute and clarinet; two trumpets; etc.) or multiple vocal parts in a choir or ensemble, whereas the brace connects multiple parts for a single instrument (e.g., the right-hand and left-hand staves of a piano or harp part).

MT82_Thirty_Second_Note

MT82_Thirty_Second_Note

In music, a thirty-second note (American) or demisemiquaver (British) is a note played for  1⁄32 of the duration of a whole note (or semibreve). It lasts half as long as a sixteenth note (or semiquaver) and twice as long as a sixty-fourth (or hemidemisemiquaver).

MT83_Thirty_Second_Rest

MT83_Thirty_Second_Rest

A related symbol is the thirty-second rest or demisemiquaver rest, which denotes a silence for the same duration.

MT84_Ghost_Note

MT84_Ghost_Note

A note with a rhythmic value, but no discernible pitch when played. It is represented by a (saltire) cross (similar to the letter x) for a note head instead of an oval.

MT85_Breath_Mark

MT85_Breath_Mark

In a score, this symbol tells the performer to take a breath (or make a slight pause for non-wind instruments). This pause usually does not affect the overall tempo. For bowed instruments, it indicates to lift the bow and play the next note with a downward (or upward, if marked) bow.

MT86_Double_Flat

MT86_Double_Flat

Lowers the pitch of a note by two chromatic semitones. Usually used when the note to modify is already flatted by the key signature.

MT87_Double_Sharp

MT87_Double_Sharp

Raises the pitch of a note by two chromatic semitones. Usually used when the note to modify is already sharpened by the key signature.

MT88_Time_Signature_12-8

MT88_Time_Signature_12-8

The bottom number represents the note value of the basic pulse of the music (in this case the 4 represents the crotchet or quarter-note). The top number indicates how many of these note values appear in each measure. This example announces that each measure is the equivalent length of three crotchets (quarter-notes). For example, 3/4 is pronounced as "three-four time" or "three-quarter time".

MT89_Common_Time

MT89_Common_Time

This symbol represents 4/4 time. It derives from the broken circle that represented "imperfect" duple meter in fourteenth-century mensural time signatures.

MT90_Alla_Breve

MT90_Alla_Breve

This symbol represents 2/2 time, indicating two minim (or half-note) beats per measure. Here, a crotchet (or quarter note) would get half a beat.

MT91_Quintillo

MT91_Quintillo

A Quintillo is a tuple of 5 notes. A number of notes of irregular duration are performed within the duration of a given number of notes of regular time value; e.g., five notes played in the normal duration of four notes; seven notes played in the normal duration of two; three notes played in the normal duration of four. Tuplets are named according to the number of irregular notes; e.g., duplets, triplets, quadruplets, etc.

MT92_Pianississimo

MT92_Pianississimo

Extremely soft. Very infrequently does one see softer dynamics than this, which are specified with additional letter "p"

MT93_Fortississimo

MT93_Fortississimo

Extremely loud. Very infrequently does one see louder dynamics than this, which are specified with additional "f"

MT94_Tenuto

MT94_Tenuto

This symbol indicates play the note at its full value, or slightly longer. It can also indicate a slight dynamic emphasis or be combined with a staccato dot to indicate a slight detachment.

MT95_Harmonic

MT95_Harmonic

On a stringed instrument, means to play a natural harmonic (also called flageolet). On a valved brass instrument, means play the note"open" (without lowering any valve, or without mute). In organ notation, this means play a pedal note with the heel (above the note, use the right foot; below the note, use the left foot). In percussion notation this denotes, among many other specific uses, to open the hi-hat by releasing the pedal, or allow an instrument to ring.

MT96_Turn

MT96_Turn

When placed directly above the note, the turn (also known as a gruppetto) indicates a sequence of upper auxiliary note, principal note, lower auxiliary note, and a return to the principal note. When placed to the right of the note, the principal note is played first, followed by the above pattern. Placing a vertical line through the turn symbol or inverting it, it indicates an inverted turn, in which the order of the auxiliary notes is reversed.

MT97_Tremolo

MT97_Tremolo

A rapidly repeated note. If the tremolo is between two notes, then they are played in rapid alternation. The number of slashes through the stem (or number of diagonal bars between two notes) indicates the frequency to repeat (or alternate) the note. As shown here, the note is to be repeated at a demisemiquaver (thirty-second note) rate, but it is a common convention for three slashes to be interpreted as "as fast as possible", or at any rate at a speed to be left to the player's judgment.

MT98_Simile

MT98_Simile

Denote that preceding groups of beats or measures are to be repeated. In the examples here, the first usually means to repeat the previous measure, and the second usually means to repeat the previous two measures.

MT99_DaCapo

MT99_DaCapo

Da Capo (lit. "From top") Tells the performer to repeat playing of the music from its beginning. This is usually followed by al fine (lit. "to the end"), which means to repeat to the word fine and stop, or al coda (lit. "to the coda (sign)"), which means repeat to the coda sign and then jump forward. - Da Segno (lit. "From the sign") Tells the performer to repeat playing of the music starting at the nearest segno. This is followed by al fine or al coda just as with da capo.

MT100_Andantino

MT100_Andantino

Slightly faster than Andante (although in some cases it can be taken to mean slightly slower than andante) (80–108 bpm).

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